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Submitted: 25 September 2012 Modified: 11 October 2012
HERDIN Record #: R04A-DLSHSI-12092511364236

Effects of honey on superficial wound healing.

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Methodology

This study utilized the quasi experimental design specifically the non-equivalent control group design or the pre test and post test design in order to measure the effects of honey on superficial wound healing process. The respondents were selected using the criteria set by the researcher. The respondents of this study were composed of fifty pre-school children aged three to six, where half of them were assigned to treatment group and the other half to control group. The study was conducted at the selected community in Parañaque City.

The following research instruments were used for the data gathering: The adapted, modified, and validated Superficial Wound Assessment Tool was used to monitor the superficial wound healing process and to determine the profile of the respondents and the Superficial Wound Healing Chart that was utilized to monitor trends in Superficial Wound Assessment Tool (SWAT) scores over time.

The main statistical tools utilized in this study were (a) frequency distribution, (b) mean, (c) t-test, (d) percentage change.

Findings

The following findings were drawn from this study.

1. Out of 50 respondents of this study, profile shows that a good number of them were: (a) 3 - 4 years old (26 or 52%), and (b) male (28 or 56%).

2. The superficial wound healing status of the control group before the application of honey had a mean score of 2.60 which is interpreted as no superficial wound healing; while after the application of honey, a computed mean score of 2.16 and 2.00 on days 2 and 3 which is interpreted as no superficial wound healing and a computed mean score of 1 .64 and 1 .24 on days 4 and 5 which is interpreted as minimal superficial wound healing. In the treatment group, the superficial wound healing status before the application of honey had a mean score of 2.12 which is interpreted as no superficial wound healing; while after the application of honey, a computed mean score of 1.92 and 1.20 on days 2 and 3 which is interpreted as minimal superficial wound healing and a computed mean score of 0.92 and 0.36 on days 4 and 5 which is interpreted as moderate wound healing.

3. In terms of significant differences on the status of superficial wound healing of the respondents after the application of honey on day 2, the control group has a mean difference of 0.44 and paired t-test ratio of 3.773 with a probability (significance) value of 0.001 was statistically significant at 0.05 level using 24 degrees of freedom while on the treatment group, there was no significant difference on the superficial wound healing status which has a mean difference of 0.20 and paired t-test ratio of 2.00 with a probability (significance) value of 0.057 at 0.05 level using 24 degrees of freedom. Days 3 to 5 of the control group obtained a mean difference and paired t - ratio of 0.60 and 3.6474 on day 3, 0.96 and 6.532 on day 4, and 1 .36 and 7.494 on day 5 with probability (significance) value ranging from <0.000 to <0.001 were statistically significant at 0.05 level using 48 degrees of freedom, while on days 3 to 5 of the treatment group obtained a mean difference ranging from 0.72 to 1 .76 and paired t - ratio ranging it from 4.884 to 12.164 on days 3 to 5 all with probability (significance) value of <0.000 was statistically significant at 0.05 level using 48 degrees of freedom.

Conclusions

In light of the study, the following conclusions were drawn:

1. Most of the respondents were male ages 3 to 4 years old and males.

2. The respondents in the control group and treatment group have no superficial wound healing before the application of honey. Status of the superficial wound healing in the control group following the application of honey on days 2 and 3 remains the same but on days 4 and 5, the status of the superficial wound healing improved from no superficial wound healing to minimal wound healing, while on the treatment group improvement shows on days 2 and 3 which from no superficial wound healing to minimal wound healing and on day 4 and 5, moderate wound healing occurs.


3. There is no significant difference on the status of superficial wound healing of the respondents before the application of honey. There is no significant difference on the status of superficial wound healing of the respondents after the application of honey on day two but there is significant difference on the status of superficial wound healing of the respondents after the application of honey on days 3 to 5. Topical application of honey on superficial wounds shows a promising effect on the status of its healing. Honey is an economical substance and widely available in most communities which can be used in superficial wounds to facilitate faster wound healing thus preventing infection.


Objectives

A. General

To determine the effects of honey on superficial wound healing process.

B. Specific

1. To determine the profile of the respondents in terms of age and gender.

2. To determine the status of superficial wound healing before and after the application of honey between those who are exposed and not exposed to intervention.

3. To determine if there are significant differences in the status of superficial wound healing before and after between those who are exposed and not exposed to honey.

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